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Full text of "In Ruhleben Camp"

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Sunday, June 6 l i 

Pricc 20 Pf. 



1915. 



WEST end TÄILORS ^S 

BREECHES ^ * 
MÄKERS . # 

^i^V New brauch now opened at 



LONDON 
PARIS 

BERLIN 



Ruhleben between Barrack 2 & 3. 



THE RUHLEBEN 
DRÄMÄTIC SOCIETY 

haue in course of rehearsal: 

As you like it 
The speckled Band 
The private secretary. 



in 

Ruhleben Ca 




NU. 



Sunday, June 6£ 



1915. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

THE RUMOUR 1 

HOLES & CORNERS 2 

THE MAN OF THE FORTNIGHT (Illustration) 5 

HOLES & CORNERS (contd.) 4 

THE SEVEN AGES OF A KRIEGSGEFANGENER (Poem) 7 

THE FOOTBALL SEASON 8 

CAPTAIN BRASSBOUND'S CO N VE RS ION 10 

THE FOOTBALL SEASOA (contd.) 11 

DEBATING SOCIETY 12 

THE TALKING CLUB 12 

THE SPORTS 14 

CHURCH NÖTIGES . 19 

THE RUHLEBEN CONCERT SEASON 19 

BITS OF THE CAMP: THE PARCELS POST OFFICE 

(Illustration) 21 

OFFICIAL BULLETIN 24 

MR. DIX'S LATEST EXERCISE (Illustration) 25 

OFFICIAL BULLETIN (contd.) 26 

OFFICIAL BULLETIN (contd.) 31 



THE RUMOUR. 

ND the Camp reveals itself in many ways." Curious 
that so long should elapse before it adopted so 
obvious a medium as that of a Journal. However, 
we propose to offer it that medium and trust that 
we shall secure the Cooperation of all our feliow 
" campers" in making this paper a real expression 
of Camp life. We do not represent any section, official or unofficial. 
We are here as a mouthpiece and it is for the Camp itself to see 
that we fulfil our object. We throw our columns open for discussion 
on any subject of Camp interest, and trust that we may be able 
to let the fresh air of public criticism blow into dusty corners and 
also do our share in enabling our fellows to lead a freer and more 
active life. This is our first number, alas, it will not be our last, 
— a quaint wish but our readers will understand. 




HOLES & CORNERS. 

THE Organisation of the Camp is being added to day by day. 
Truly may we say, "Consider the officials, how they grow!" 
Unkind pcople might continue the quotation, but really the rest is 
not apt in this case. One very interesting feature of Camp Organi- 
sation, with regard to which the general public is quite ignorant, 
is the Entertainment Committee, which has recently been set up 
by the initiative of the Captains' Office. The arrangement at present 
is that all entertainment funds are centralised and all bookings for 
the hall, etc. are made by Camp officials. Thus, for instance, the 
expences of the produetion of "Captain Brassbound" was borne 
by the entertainment fund and the profits which ran something 
like 400 M. will also remain in the hands of that body to be 
applied to suitable and Camp requirements. 

Owing to the permission for the setting up of shower baths 
in each barrack not having been obtained the 900 M. made by 
the "Mumming Birds" is still in the Captains' hands, while a 
second nine hundred, the result of the Revue has been added thereto. 

Of course, there are decidedly two opinions on this centrali- 
sation idea and the plea of some of the people who get up these 
entertainments to be allowed to name the objeets towards which 
the profits shall go seems to be only reasonable. We shall have 
more to say on this matter in our next issue. 



THE Camp is not to suffer through any lack of entertainment 
during the summer months ; it has already been demonstrated that 
however hot the weather, any decent entertainment can command 
a large audience. Thus encouraged the George Edwardses and 
Granville Barkers of the Camp are going ahead with preparations. 

The Dramatic Society will shortly present 'The Speckled Band" 
by Conan Doyle, "As You Like It" and "The Private Secretary". 
The first-named play will, we feel sure, "fetch 'em", Opportunities 
of seeing Mr. Adler as the villain of the piece will not oeeur every 
day. Those who know him are looking forward to a really villainous 
presentation. 

The Shakespeare produetion ought to be a great success in 
such hands a those of Mr. Leigh Henry and Mr. Duncan Jones, 
if only the latter will refrain from following his co-worker's example 
of adopting German measles at a most inopportune moment. The 
music which has been written by Prof. Treharne is of quite an 
original character and should arouse some interesting discussion. 

With regard to "The Private Secretary", there is nothing much 

tO Say. It iS that type Of play. (Continued on page 4) 



— 3 — 



-s 



y 



The Man of the Fortnight, Mr. Sullivan. 



— 4 — 

Our representative called on Mr. Tapp and askcd if he were 
going to give the Camp morc girls, "a deprobation we feel vurry 
keenly" to quote "Captain Brassbound". We were delighted to hear 
that Mr. Tapp has booked the well-known troupe of "Tiller Girls" 
who will appear at a not far-distant date with the "prima danceuse", 
Senoretta Donna Gionita, — more expense for the Captains! 

The Irish players, too, are busy, and in the course of a week 
or two the same party who delighted us at the Irish Concert will 
present us with an original play. 

Änother party of Ihrishmen will, we hope, soon give us a 
chance of witnessing the production in Ruhleben of one of Mr. W. 
B. Yeates' plays, or even a couple. These would prove a charming 
antidote to the ill-effects of the excessive laughter indulged in at 
the production of the "Private Secretary". 

In the course of the next week also Mr. Lindsay and Mr. George 
Ferguesson will hold an invitation vocal and piano recital on strictly 
classical lines, the programme will include selections from the works 
of Bach, Brahms and Beethoven. 

Still the list is not complete, for we believe promenade concerts 
are in the wind. 

MR. Platford, the Librarian, asks us to put in a plea for French 
books for the library, as his present supply is far from coinciding 
with the demand. We hope in our next number to be able to give 
the Camp some particulars as to the work the library is doing, 
but let us in the meantime cordially support Mr. Platford's request. 
This does not mean, of course, that English and German books 
are not welcome. On the contrary, they are — — very! 



THE Ruhleben Golf Course has proved a decided success, though 
greens and bunkers (except human ones now and again) be missing, 
still the play has been of a most interesting character and the 
opportunity of keeping in form is thus afforded to a considerable 
number of Professionals in the Camp. Ä large number have seized 
the opportunity of taking lessons at considerably lower rates than 
those in force at home and quite a number will be able to say 
quite airily "Oh I picked up my golf while a prisoner of war". 



AT the time of going to press the cricketnets have been set 
up and prac ice is in progress ; it will be an interesting experiment 
for most of our players to try their hands on a matting wicket and 
we ought to see some exciting games, an account of the first match 
of the season will be found in our Stop Press columns and in our 
next issue we hope to have an article on cricketers we have among 



— 5 — 

us. Throughout the season we shall publish füll reports o! all 
matches and shall be grateful if club secretaries will notify us o! 
all forthcoming gamcs. 

MR. Adler has asked us to express in these columns his sincere 
gratitude to the members of the musical fraternity, both amateur 
and professional, whose whole-hearted support has enabled him to 
make the past musical season such a pronounced success. He also 
asked us to convey his thanks to the Camp, as a whole, for the 
generous appreciation it has meted out to him. Only a man who 
has done such work in the Camp can realise what a tremendous 
help it is to feel that one's efforts do not meet with cold criticism 
but are judged according to the means at the command of the 
conductor, and even then, judged generously. 

Asked as to row long he and his colleagues intended to enjoy 
their well-earned rest, Mr. Adler informed us, that the first concert 
of the next season will take place on Sunday, September 5 th , when 
he itends to present "Hiawatha's Wedding Feast" by Coleridge 
Taylor, the score of which has been kindly presented to the or- 
chestra by the Editor,' Noveilo & Co., London. Mr. Peebles-Conn 
and Mr. Lindsay will be the first soloists at the first orchestral 
evening, the programme of which will inciude the Violin Concerto 
of Saint-Saens and the Ukrain Rhapsody for Piano & Orchestra 
by Liepounow and the Violin Concerto by Wienawsky. Thus it 
will be seen that Mr. Adler intends to follow on the lines which 
he has laid down in the past season and which have been so 
successful. 

On All Souls' Day, Verdi's Requiem will be performed. The 
Edito7T~Mr7~Ricordi öf Milan, has been kind enough to send" the 
Camp the füll score. 

So far as innovations are concerned, Mr. Adler was very chary 
in giving information and would only admit that a Performance 
of a musical comedy, possibly "The Mikado", was on the tapis. 



THE recent establishment of the Summer House Club reminds 
us of a story, which the late Mr. Arthur Mersall, the well-known 
missioner, was fond a telling. He dreamt that he was being shown 
round heaven, and having passed through the great court and the 
minor courts, they paused before a small door and St. Peter invited 
him to look trough the keyhole. He did so and saw that the room 
contained only a few. A few who seemed to find eternal bliss 
in mutual admiration. "Who are they?" he enquired of the Saint. 
"Sh — h!" was the reply, and they tiptoed away. When a con- 
siderable distance from the door, he again asked "But who are 
those people?" "They are the Brethren" replied Peter, and 



— 6 — 

added in response to the query in MersalPs expression, "but it 
would never do to let them know that anyone eise had got to 
heaven" . 

WITHOUT overstepping the bounds of modesty we think we 
may say that the present and future issues of "In Ruhleben Camp" 
will be sufficient evidence as to the presence among us of a large 
number of artists and we are interested to hear that there is a 
scheme in the wind of holding an exhibition of artistic work done 
in the camp. 



THE CHURCH IN THE CAMP. 

IN ENGLAND the Church has had a wonderful awakening 
in the last ten months. 

IN RUHLEBEN the Church needs fuller support to help 
spread the same awakening spirit. 

IN ENGLAND there has been a great revival of Family 
Prayers, the late Lord Roberts started the movement, 

IN RUHLEBEN there is 5 minutes of common prayer every 
Evening at 9 o'clock. 

IN ENGLAND the churches have subscribed thousands of 
pounds for the sufferers in the War. 

IN RUHLEBEN there are no collections at the Services, we 
only ask you to come and give them your support. 

I! you can't take part in the Church of England Services, 
come to the Wednesday Evening Service, which is populär 
and free in character, but 

do come to one of them! 

The Camp Services are got up by men in the Camp FOR 
the Camp, and suggestions and advice are always welcome. 

See list of Services in this issue. 



— 7 — 

THE SEVENÄGES OF A KRIEGSGEFANGENER. 

II LL the world's a cage, 
-* *■ Änd all the men within it weary players ; 
They have no cxits, only entrances, 
Where each spends many months ere he departs. 
At first the Newcomer, 
With china bowl and palliass oi straw, 
Änd apprehensive mien, as who should say 
'What cruel lot has Fate for me in störe?' 
Änd then the Student, with his cloth-bound Otto, 
For foreign languages are now his motto, 
Älleviates the woes of his position 
By laying up a störe of Erudition. 
He seeks the shining morning hours to pass 
With verbs irregulär and der, die, das; 
Upon the Promenade he daily walks, 
And with his Tutor French or German talks. 
Next comes the Lover, a lead pencil biting 
A weekly card to his loved one inditing; 
Reflect on this ye Dorothies and Daisies 
When you peruse your lover's fiery praises 
Nor start, Ängelic Doras, Claras, Mossies 
When blushingly you look upon those Grosses! 
The Mariner next comes upon the view. 
His uniform and language both are blue, 
A British sailor, broad of beam and bearing, 
Füll of stränge oaths that seamen call endearing; 
From Leith and Cardiff, Hartlepool and Hüll 
He comes, and finds life here most passing dull; 
Ye Landsmen pause, ye innocents be chary, 
Lest you provoke his rieh vocabulary! 
Lo here! the Captain, badged and awe-inspiring, 
In diseipline and duty never tiring; 
The world he looks upon with scornful pity, 
Älone, unaided by the Camp Committee; 
Superior to men of common clay, 
He gains in self-importance every day. 
The Rumour-Monger now takes up the text, 
His soul by every foolish outcry vexed; 
The news that he dispenses freely one day, 
Is contradicted flat the following Monday; 
Änd last of all before we drop the curtain 
Upon the scene where life is so uncertain 
Comes he who patient, waits upon the Stage, 
Nor uninstrueted seeks to read the page; 
Well knowing that the day will come when he 
Will once again be numbered with the Free. 
Resigned to all each passing day he views 
Sans Cash, Sans Clothes, Sans Liberty, Sans Views! 

L. E. Filmore 



— 8 — 

THE FOOTBÄLL SEÄSON. 

A Review by the English International, F. B. Pentland, 
of Middlesborough F. C. 

PÄSSING through our Trafalgar Square some days ago, a man 
from Barrack 9 asked could he book the football ground for 
October l st next. It sounded a stränge request, of course, and an 
individual near by remarked, "October indeed, what's the matter 
with being at home by that time?" And yet, for those interested 
in sport, the days fly past remarkably quickly, so much so that 
before we know where we are we shall be amid the excitement 
of our second football campaign. 

One's mind wanders back to the evening in March when Cap- 
tain Powell (at one of Mr. Day's populär concerts) announced that 
permission had been granted for the use of the inner part of the 
race-course for sports. The sporting spirit of the Britisher was 
evidenced by the magnificent roar of approval which greeted 
the news. 

Ä movement was immediately started for the Organisation of 
football on somewhat similar lines as at home. An Association 
was formed consisting of a delegate from each barrack. We were 
wonderfully fortunate in having Mr. John Cameron, the old Totten- 
ham Hotspur manager, as our secretary. With his expert know- 
ledge and charming tact, the success of the affair was a foregone 
conclusion. Committees were formed to deal with the necessary 
matters such as finance, fixtures, etc. 

The ground had more the appearance of a morass than a foot- 
ball pitch when it was first inspected for measurement purposes, 
but small things like that were soon overcome. The start was 
made on March 28 th with a Representative match, when the follo- 
wtng teams opposed each other: 

REST: 

Ä * M Palin Le f* 

McGill Gillespie 

Harris Richards (Captain) Warner 

Hanson Perry Dixon Gardner Maw 

RUHLEBEN : 

M'Craa Dutton Cameron Bloomer (Captain) Pentland 

Brearley Wolstenholme Miller 

Young Mills 

Powell 
Baron von Taube kindly kicked off. 

The form in this game was so good that everyone could see 
that with practice the play would reach a pretty high Standard. 



— 9 — 

Two leagues were formed, a first and second, composed of first 
and second teams from 14 barracks. Clcan, hard, and strenuous 
encounters were the order of the day. Äs was anticipated every 
team showed improvement, as the season proceeded and in conse- 
quence some really excellent play was seen. 

R second representative match was played on April 19 th : 



Right 




ENGLAND: 

Still 




Ellis 


Hinkley 




Dugdale 


Brearley Warner 


Charnley 


Henson 


Burnhill Perry 


Left 




THE REST: 


Davis 


Garden 


Falck Camer on (Captain) 




Weiss 


Rogan Quinn 




Stewart (Captain) Owens 






Mills. 



Stade 
Muhl 



In a fairly long experience o! the game I have never seen a 
better, a more interesting exhibition of football, as it should be 
played, than in this match. The play was keen and clean, not a 
solitary foul being given. R third representative game was played 
on May 2 nd : 

Right ENGLAND : 

Palin 

Lithgow Heath 

Brearley Wolstenholme Warner 

Bloomer (Captain) Perry 

Pentland Burnhill Maw 

Left THE REST: 

Dauies Falck Collinson 

Garden Owens 

Weiss Quinn Dugdale 

Stewart (Captain) Owens 

Mills. 

The leagues finished May 8 th , Barrack 1 won the premier league 
and had the splendid record of going through the season without 
losing a point. What couldn't I write of my old comrade and friend, 
Steve Bloomer, the captain of the league winners. Such generalship, 
such unselfishness, such keenness for the success of his side need 
no words of mine to praise. Ä toast to Steve, "Good Luck, Old 
Sportsman". 

Barrack 10 won the second league. In addition to their excellent 
play much of their success was due to the spirit af their captain, 
R. G. Belmont, a perfect sportsman. (Continued on page ii) 



— 10 — 

CÄPTAIN BRÄSSBOUND'S CONVERSION. 

SINCE the really excellent presentation of this Play o! Shaw's, 
our Camp has witnessed the rcpctition ol that checry Revue 
"Don't Laugh" and has had it's attention absorbed by a rousing 
Sports Meeting — and yet there are to be found in the Camp men 
to whom "Captain Brassbound" was not merely an evennig's "en- 
tertainment", but something that has arrested their attention and 
compelled their thought — men who are still uncertain — men who 
are still discussing the question "What exactly does Shaw mean?" 

The clue to the general character of the Play is to be found 
in its chronological position in Shaw's Works: it comes between 
the period of destructive social criticism (e. g. Plays Pleasant & 
Unpleasant) and the period of real dramatic creativeness (Man & 
Superman) and possesses characteristics of both periods. There is 
in this play a basis of criticism, both analytic and synthetic, of 
England's legal System — designed to make clear "the evils of the 
pretence that our legal institutions represent abstract principles of 
justice, instead of being mere social scaffolding": but the Play is 
not merely an analysis; it is distinguished by the creation of three 
really dramatic characters — a foreshadowing of the Superman and 
the Superwoman. 

The whole play may be conceived as a conflict between what 
is commonly called Justice — really an imperfect man-made series 
of social Conventions, this however, while clearly feit, is not so 
easy to explain. From a spiritually crude Captain Brassbound, suf- 
fering under a brutalising sense of injustice, (Mr. Hatfield's manner 
was hardly brutal enough in this role in the first act) to a Cap- 
tain Brassbound convinced of the "vulgarity„ of his whole life's 
purpose, is easy enough to understand. But what of the conversion 
in its positive aspect? How does Captain Brassbound — he who 
when the gun announces that the schocner's anchor is weighed, 
can see a Solution to his life's purposelessness only in marriage 
— how does he straightway "stumble upon the secret of command?" 
Just as with a supersaturated Solution, a speck of dust makes the 
whole crystallise instantly, so did the gunshot crystallise the whole 
emotional content of the Captain's mind; he saw at once that mar- 
riage was not what he needed: but he realised instantly the possi- 
bility of a new attitude towards life: Lady Cicely had given him 
the sense of a new communion with Reality, something akin to the 
gift of the Holy Ghost in the laying on of hands: and for him 
life straightway became a new thing. 

London Youth will exchange strong clasp For Säle: Return ticket to London; unused; 
knife and Football cover for photo of pretty condition as new. No reasonable offer re- 
girl. Address First House, Stall 90, Bar, 1. fused. Address Pessimist, C o. Gatekeeper. 

T nQ f • Ä Potato. Reward on return to I nrf» Guide to Jerusalem. Finder requested 
J-#UöL. Contractor, Cook House. LUjL to return to Homesick, Bar. 6. 



— 11 — 

In response to the general desire of the camp, a cup competition 
was organised. There were 14 entries. Barrack 4 & 10 were the 
finalists and under the able Captaincy of John Brearley, the former 
won the cup in a splendidly contested hard game. 

This was a fitting reward to John, a quiet, unassuming, thorough 
sportsman. 

To the referees, linesmen, for their splendid work and to the 
spectators for their kindly co-operation and help, the R. F. R. offer 
their sincerest thanks. Fred B. Pentland. 

An opinion by E. Button, Late Newcastle United. 

"WELL, on the whole the football played was not at all bad", 
was Mr. Dutton's verdict. "I must say I was dissappointed that 
the Public Schools and 'Varsities did not make a better show on 
the soccer field but the one or two representatives they did send 
us played a very decent game. Judged by home amateur Standards, 
the play was certainly of a high order, though mind you I am 
talking now of the tail-end of the season. I should certainly put 
up Barrack 1, Barrack 4, and Barrack 10 teams to beat the best 
people over here, but the other elevens if up against the best 
products of this country, would I am sure, have to go all out and 
even then, we should be doubtful of the result. 

"Next season — well you needn't grin, because there is going 
to be one — I think we shall see some really hot football and 
the struggle for the trophies will be a harder one, and, I am sure 
a better one than this season's." 



Mr. Steve Bloomer; The English International, 

WHEN asked for an opinion on the Camp Football, Mr. 
Bloomer said: 

"Well, it is very hard to make a comparison between the foot- 
ball here and as played outside or at home in England. The 
feature of the play here which Struck me most forcibly was the 
splendid sporting spirit shown. 

"I have no hesitation in saying that had we to meet the best 
teams on this side or even a league reserved team we might pick 
a side that would put up a very tight game. What would the team 
be, you say? Well, I think I should choose it from the following 
players : Rogan, Gillespie, Still, Stewart, Dugdale, Owens, Maw, 
Henson, Dixon, Ellis, Warner, Palin, Perry, Richards, Crossland, 
Sullivan, Roupell, Mills, Facer, Bodin, Miliar, Falk, Owen, Burn- 
hill, Garden, Lithgow, Quinn, Collinson. 

"Of course the utter lack of training and other considerations 
over which we have no control is to be taken into consideration 
and it is only reasonable to bear in mind that had better facilities 



— 12 — 

been to hand, the play would have been of a much higher order 
than that wc have seen. R tremendous improvement has been shown 
since the beginning of the season, individually and collectively. 

"Every sport depends to a far greater extent than people ima- 
gine on its spectators and I must say that our spectators here in 
Ruhleben have watched us and judged us like real sporting 
Britishers." 

THANKS to the motherly care of some people in the Camp, 
Rugby football was barred at the beginning of the season as being 
"too rough and not at all a nice game" but at length it was 
demonstrated that we were not such a fragile lot and we were 
allowed to get on with our rugger. All who wished to play were 
allotted to a number of teams, so that every man got his game 
and an enjoyable one at that. K number of international games 
were played and we regret that the report thereof has not yet come 
to hand from those responsible for the Rugby interests in the Camp. 



DEBÄTINQ SOCIETY. 

THE original debate "That the Metrie System be Introduced into 
Great Britain" having fallen through owing to the inability 
of the committee to find a Speaker to oppose, it was deeided to 
hold an impromptu. Victims were called for from the audience. 
Two, Mr. Ricardo and Mr. Howard, stepped up nobly to the sacri- 
ficial altar (presiding priest, Mr. Butterworth). The subjeet of Plural 
Voting was announced and a good debate ensued, Mr. Russell 
leading for the affirmative and Mr. Howard opposing. Several 
excellent Speeches were made on both sides, and on the show of 
hands, the principle of one man, one vote was carried by a com- 
fortable majority. 

The subjeet for the next debate is "That Corporal Punishment in 
Schools be Äbolished", Opener — Mr. Ford; Opposer — Mr.Straham 



THE TALKING CLUB. 

LIKE plum-pudding, the Debating Society is essentially an English 
Institution. Like plum-pudding no foreigner can stand it, or 
realise how we stand it. However, it did strike a few bright spi- 
rits in the nebulous days of November that what the Camp needed 
was some jolly, cheerful entertainment and forthwith they announced 
a debate on "Divorce". 

The debaters met in loft B. of Barrack 2 and it is rumoured 
that the discussion carried on on that subjeet by the members of 



— 13 — 

the loft, but not members of the Debating Society, was by far the 
more interesting one. However, 50 seriously-inclined debaters turncd 
up, which was at least sufficient evidence that a portion of the Camp 
did want to debate. The next week that "War is an Essential Factor 
in the Progress o! the Human Race" was discussed. Ägain an un- 
official Informant teils us that Concentration Camps were regarded 
by both sides of the house as essentially retrogressive feature of 
wariare. Ä third debate on "Manhood Suffrage" evoked the opinion 
of the man in the loft that "this was getting a bit thick and if that 
blighter stood on his bed again he'd be able to talk on Flying the 
next Friday." The D. S. took the — er — hint and decided to 
take the Grand Stand Hall. 

To. Mr. C. J. Pearce rests the honour of having arranged the 
first GRAND STAND HALL ENTERTAINMENT. Naturally at this 
point, the lust for committees evinced itself with the result that a 
formal society came into life with Prof. Delmer as Chairman of the 
Committee (when that gentleman left us, mourned but congratu- 
lated, Mr. T. Falk took his place) Mr. Butterworth, President ; Mr. 
C. J. Pearce, Secretary and a committee representative off all barracks. 

The first debate in the hall attracted an audience of over eight 
hundred and from that day on the weekly debate has been a really 
populär feature of Camp life. The average attendance has been 
about six hundred and such is the enthusiasm that even in the 
summer, despite the rival attractions of the promenade and the coon 
minstrels and the religious Service on the Grand Stand more than 
300 have remained loyal and have resolved to continue their mee- 
tings throughout the hot weather. 

The list of motions discussed is charming in its variety, if not 
startling in ist originality, and on several occasions huge fun has 
been provided. "That Bachelors be Taxed," for instance was a 
foregone conclusion, the meeting deciding wholeheartedly that 
bachelorhood was enough of a tax in itself. "Gambiing," "Prof es- 
sionalism in Sport", "State Theatre", "Compulsory Elementary 
Education", „The Degeneracy (or not) of Modern English Literature", 
"The Cinema", "Capital Punishment", "The Success or Unsuccess 
of Cooperation in England", "Press v. Pulpit", "Women Suffrage" 
all had due attention meted out to them. 

Ä delightful break in the Session was provided by the "Mock 
Trial", written by Mr. Hamlyn and Mr. Israel Cohen artd produced 
by Mr. C. J. Pearce. For this entertainment, the Camp was really 
exceedingly grateful to the D. S., it was evinced by the uproarious 
aplause which greeted the conclusion of the successive Performances, 

Ä report of the two recent debates will be found on another 
page while the official announcements of the Society re future fixtures 
is included in our advertising columns. 



— 14 — 

THE SPORTS. 

Finalisis and their Form — Füll Results. 

PERHÄPS it was fitting that Empire Day should have been celebrated 
in this Camp by a sports meeting, for, though there are those 
among us who decry the competitive spirit and wearily ask when 
Englishmen are going to take an interest in the interesting things 
oi üfe, yet the majority of us somehow feel that it was, after all, 
the call of the blood to which the men responded when iliey 
stepped on to the track, ready to run their guts out or jump their 
necks off. 

We may have taken it a little too seriously, but that was more 
the fault of the committee than our own for providing us with a 
menu, consisting only of beef steak items und a mere couple of 
the trifles. To see the fine entries for the sack and obstacle races 
made one feel, that after all the sporting instinct has not left us, 
and these were perhaps the races with the best expression of the 
Camp. "I can't run against these nuts, but anyhow I'll have a shot 
at something" was the spirit in which the entries for these events 
were made and that is the spirit we ought to foster. 

Äs far as serious work goes, there were of course three outstan- 
ding names, Edwards, Smyllie and Macintosh. Edwards came as 
no surprise to the Camp, but although his winds were a foregone 
conclusion, yet at the same time, this did not defect from the 
pleasure of the day, for such running as he can show us is an 
absolute joy to see. Edwards of course is by far the more 
experienced hand at the game and did not by any means over- 
shoot the expectations of those who knew of his previous Performances 
on the track. Being also a comparatively late-comer to the Camp, 
he had advantages as regards training and fitness, which served 
him well. It is interesting to look at his past record and then 
perhaps a better estimate can be formed of his Ruhleben Performances. 

As a member of the Verein für Volkssport — Teutonia, he 
ran in the Olympic trials held in June 1914 at Berlin and distin- 
guishcd himself by achieving a wonderful second in the 200 metres, 
the winner Raw setting up a world's record on that occasion by 
doing the distance in 21 6 /i , Edwards Coming in only a second 
later. At the International Sports, held at Berlin in July of the 
same year, he obtained again second place with Raw as winner 
in the 100 metres. The time was 10 9 /i . Later on he ran third 
in the 100 metres to Raw and Patterson and on another occasion 
ran second to Raw over the same distance, the time being 10 9 /i . 
At Budapest he again contested the 200 metres with Patterson and 
this time won in 22 seconds. Taking all this into consideration one 
can have no hesitation whatever in putting Edwards down as an 
even-timer and remembering that he is only 17 years of age and 



— 15 — 

has yet to set, one may yct be ablc to boast of having included 
a record holder. 

The other two men, on the contrary, are neither of them runners 
of any great experience. Smyllie carried off a few handicap prizes 
at Dublin University, while Macintosh was only persuaded last year 
by his brother, the well-known Light Blue, to take up running and 
made his debut at the Bern Exhibition in Switzerland. 

THE SPRINTS. 

TURNING to the separate races, one may say that the interest 
in the 100 yds. really lay in the forthcoming struggle between 
Smyllie and Macintosh for the second place. In this race Edwards 
showed himself, as regards style, to be the perfect runner. Of the 
other two, Macintosh's style was certainly the better, but 
Smyllie's natural strength and good form inclined one to favour 
his chances. His consistent running throughout the day, in spite 
of his crocked leg, plucky chap that he is, confirmed one in this 
opinion. Running second to Edwards, and a good second at that, 
is certainly a Performance that he may well be proud of, although 
it is only fair to the former to say, he seemed to have some speed 
still up his sleeve. This event made one feel that a 100 yds. was 
the distance for Edwards, while on the other hand one was inclined 
to put 220 yds. as the best distance for Smyllie to show himself 
to füll advantage. The starting, we regret to say, was not all that 
it might have been, and the men's steadiness on the mark does 
them the utmost credit, only those who have themselves done some 
running know how difficult it is to avoid breaking and how fatal 
it is if the pistol should catch one when one is just recovering 
from a false Impulse. 

In this event, as in all the others, Edwards' running was 
characterised by its extreme suppleness and loosenes in all his 
motions, his free swing of the arm and long stride ; Smyllie being 
somewhat stockily built, is to be excused for not getting off the 
mark with all celerity possible. The main fault of his running 
seems to lie in the fact that he gets too niuch down on the flat 
of his foot, thus missing a lot of spring and shortening his stride. 
Macintosh could do with a looser action, though he does get nicely 
on to his toes. The 1 00 yds. were covered in ll 2 / 5 , the 75 in 
8 4 / 5 , which, considering the difficulties — the men were running 
on sand and in all sorts of conditions of shoes it must be re~ 
membered — was good running. The best time in the Sprint races 
was achieved in the 220 yds., this being done in 24 seconds. "Ä 
top-hole Performance under the circumstances" say those that know. 

The quarter mile might have been faster, considering the quality 
of the men running. No doubt Edwards could manage the distance 
under 50 seconds, given favourable conditions (the world record 



— 16 — 

on a grass track is held by Niger Barker, the Olympian runner, 
whose time is 48 1 /a secs.) Ellis deserves a word of commendation 
for the good race he put up. The comparatively slow time o! this 
race was due to the very steady start. One expects to see a quick 
start and if there be any slacking, for this to occur toward the 
middle of the distance and then a spurt for the last hundred yards. 
Before we dismiss the Sprints we might mention the misunder- 
standing that arose in one of the heats for the 100 yds. as a result 
of which the race was re-run. In the opinion of a large majority 
of the spectators, there was no ground for complaint against Roberts, 
who was much too far ahead of the third man to have prejudiced 
the latter's chances. Hard luck Roberts! Better luck next time! 
In any case the officials might take note, as it is usual in case 
of complaint, either to disqualify the man or to let his win stand, 
and never to take the rather wavering course which was adopted 
on Monday. By the way, a hint here for the tyros among us: 
run toward some fixed point, a tree, for instance, and then your 
straight line will come without effort. This should always be done, 
even in training. 

THE DISTÄNCES. 

IN comparison with the mile, the half was rather disappointingly 
slow or perhaps it would be more cheerful to say, in comparison 
with the half, the mile was unexpectedly fast. We congratulate 
J. Wright of Bar. 6 on his easy race and capital time, 4 minutes 
59 seconds. With more training, Croote would have put up much 
better fight, but even as it was the plucky manner in which he 
stuck to his guns compelled admiration. 

Several of the men in the distances were badly done up and 
perhaps this will be a lesson and next time they will not neglect 
even such opportunities of training as Ruhleben offers. It is quite 
certain that had more training been done, and after all, it is the 
training that has the lasting beneficial effect and a healthy body 
is worth a lot more than a row of potts — the times altogether 
would have been better. 

The walk was an easy win for Gaunt, although Walker looks 
a good stayer. Here again a word in the committee's ear. It 
would be just as well to formulate strict rules before the meeting 
rather than to make them on the spot. 

THE JUMPS. 

ÄS regards the broad jump, another word in the ear of the 
committee. Congratulations on the excellent way in wich they 
prepared the pit — no easy matter. The take-off however might 
have been a deal better, as it was hard to judge the distance for 
the Sprint. McGilPs jump, 19 ft. 6 in. was certainly very good for 
Ruhleben. 



— 17 — 

The high jump proved the brcathless event of thc day. No-one 
could have picked out the winner beforehand and curiously enough, 
no-one could do it afterwards. Both Groening and Reid are really 
pretty jumpers, taking the bar with a grace and ease delightful to 
witness. So well did they start that one began to think ol 5 ft. 
7 in. and such flights. But alas at 5 it 4 x / 2 in. the füll stop came. 
By the way, this is minus the sag in the cross-bar. It certainly 
was an innovation to measure the sidepoles and not from the middle 
of the bar. On the whole, one was inclined to award the honours 
to Reid. Had he been able to twist as neatly as Groening did, one 
can have no hesitation in saying he would have cleared the bar. 

Groening's win in the hurdles was no surprise, and the time 
might have been much better. Next time we hope to see Master- 
man fit and well and then Monday's winner will have to look to 
his laureis. Competitors in this event might bear in mind that it 
is absolutely necessary to practice the three strides between the 
hurdles. The man who attempts five is doomed. Also M. Com- 
mitteeman, it is usual to put up the hurdles after each heat and 
not let a man walk through, as was actually the case. Allowing 
the same man to draw a bye in the heats and again in the semi- 
final was really a bit thick. And while on this subject, it would 
be well to mention that it is usual to see a field of at least half 
a dozen turn out of each heat and avoid too many events such 
as we saw on Monday. 

OTHER EVENTS. 

THE Tug of War was a far greater success than is usually 
achieved by this event at sporting meetings. The old stagers of 
No. 4 had to go all out to get the youngsters of 1 1 over the mark. 
We want to see the same teams up against each other again and 
that is the highest praise we can give them. Well pulled four! 
Well cheered Mr. Cocker! 

One does not talk of times with regard to sack races or obstacle 
races. No world's records of these events are published, but one 
feels inclined to award the palm to the brainy youngster who tried 
somersaulting the course. As for the actual winner of the sack- 
race, one is really inclined to enquire as to whether he has any 
kangaroo blood in him. 

The Obstacle Race migth have had a few more obstacles. A 
Suggestion to the Committee ! A great idea ! Before the next sports 
meeting, this magazine shall hold a competition for the most ingenious 
obstacles. 

The Relay Race was a royal battle of the Glans, or perhaps 
battle of the barracks, we ought to say. Here again Edwards had 
a birthday. He literally pinched points. Well run Barrack 7 ! 

It is impossible to close without a word re the Comittee. Perhaps 
those gentlemen are of the opinion that we have already had enough 



18 — 



words in their ear. But knowing them to be sound sportsmcn all, 
one has no fear that they will take a little friendly criticism amiss. 
They have laid a great dcbt of gratitude upon thc Camp. The 
arrangemcnt of such a mccting means untold work, we shall never 
fully realisc und never fully recognise. But this time, at all events, 
we will try (we dare not say u to give the devil his due"). 

Thank you, Mr. Committeeman, thank you ! 

The results and the list of officials are appended : 



GOLF COMPETITION. 

Driving : E. D. Ellis — Barrack 7 — 

232 yards. 
Äpproaching: Ä Andrews- Barrack 3. 

DRILL CLÄSS DISPLAY. 

Arranged by Mr. G. Dix. 

100 YÄRDS OPEN. 

H. Edwards — Barrack 11 — 1. 
R. M. Smyllie — Barrack 7 — 2. 
E. C. Macintosh — Barrack 8 — 3. 
Time: 11 2 / B secs, 

TWO MILES WALKING CONTEST. 

W. Gaunt — Barrack 5—1. 
/. Bates — Barrack 12 — 2. 
G. V/alker — Barrack 13 — 3. 

Time: 18 min. 52 secs. 

75 YÄRDS OLD ÄGE HANDICAP. 

S. 3loomer (Scr.) — Barrack 11 — 1. 

C. Hamlin (2 yds.) — Barrack 7 — 2. 

M. Calvert (5 yds ) — Barrack 5 — 3. 

Time: 9 3 A secs. 

75 YÄRDS OPEN. 

H. Edwards — Barrack 11 — 1. 
R. M. Smyllie — Barrack 7 — 2. 
E. C. Macintosh — Barrack 8 — 3. 
Time: 8 4 / 5 secs. 

100 YÄRDS JOCKEYS HANDICAP. 

C. Moore (Scr.) — Barrack 9 — 1. 

G.Wedgewood (7 yds.) — Barr. 2 — 2. 

W. Lister (11 yds.) — Barrack 11—3. 

Time: 12 1 /s secs. 

HÄLF-MILE OPEN. 

R. B. Brown — Barrack 9 — 1. 
C.J. Sherry — Barrack 10 — 2. 
J. McLaren — Barrack 2 — 3. 

Time: 2 rnins. 16 secs. 

220 YÄRDS OPEN. 

H. Edwards — Barrack 11 — 1. 
R. M. Smyllie - Barrack 7 I Dead Heat 
E. C. Macintosh — Barr. 8 j 2. 
A W. Hill — Barrack 10 — 3. 

Time: 24 secs. 



QUÄRTER MILE OPEN. 

H. Edwards — Barrack 11 — 1. 
C. D. Ellis — Barrack 7 — 2. 
R. Osbourne — Barrack 13 — 3. 

Time: 56 x /2 secs. 

ONE MILE OPEN. 

P. Wright — Barrack 6 — 1. 
H. Crute — Barrack 3 — 2. 
H. Beckles — Barrack 5 — 3. 

Time: 4 mins. 59 secs. 

100 YÄRDS HANDICAP. 

H. Slvfield (7 yds.) — Barrack 5 — 1. 

Ä. Kelly (10 yds.) — Barrack 4 — 2. 

R. M. Smyllie (Scr.) — Barrack 7 — 3. 

Time : ll 1 / 5 secs. 

120 YÄRDS HURDLES OPEN. 

0. Groening — Barrack 7 — 1. 
H. Ä. McGill — Barrack 10 — 2. 
F. Roberts — Barrack 13 — 3. 

Time: 19 secs. 

THREE LEGGED RÄCE OPEN. 

R. Woodward & R. Bruce 

— Barrack 9 — 1. 
J. S. Hatfield & W. L. Reid 

— Barrack 7 — 2. 
Ä. Underwood & R. Steadman 

— Barrack 10 — 3. 

RUNNING HIGH JUMP. 

O. Groening — Barr. 7 \ Both equal at 
W. L. Reid — Barr. 7 j 5 ft. 472 ins. 

TUG — OF WAR. 

Barrack 4 beat Barrack 10. 

RELÄY RÄCE. ONE MILE OPEN. 

220 yards. 
Run as 7 2 mü*e- 
loilows: 220 yards. 

74 mile. 
4 mins. 11 72 secs. 



Barrack 7 — 1. 

Barrack 11 — 2. 

Barrack 10 — 3. 
Time 



— 19 — 

DIVINE SERVICES IN THE CAMP. 

Ä Church of England Service is held in the hall every Sunday after- 
noon. On the iirst, ihird & iifth Sunday oi the month, the Preacher is the 
Rev. H. M. Williams, M. Ä., British Chaplain in Berlin, and the Service 
commences at 3.30 p. m. 

On the second and fourth Sundays, the Preacher is Mr. Kemp, of the 
Hamburg Seaman's Mission and the Service commences at 2.45 p. m. 

Holy Communion is celebrated by Mr. Williams on the first Sunday oi 
every month at 7 a. m. 

In addition to these Services, vvhich are arranged for by the authorities 
of the camp, WEEK-DÄY SERVICES of a broad and undenominational 
character are held, as follows: 

The Wednesday Evening Service, every Wednesday at 7 p. m., when 
addresses on subjects oi a broad religious interest are given by various 
members oi the Camp. 

The 5 Minutes Evensong, held in the open air on the third grandstand 
every evening at 9 p. m. 

The latter Services are controiled by the Service Committee, G. H. Butter- 
worth (Chairman), C. Duncan- Jones, A. J. Kemp, W. Rojlands Cooper, and 
J. D. Ketchum (Secy.). 

The above times are subject to changes, which are announced in the 
special weekly notices. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC SERVICES. 

Sundays : Solemn Mass with Sermon and Benediction at 8 a. m. in the Grand 
Stand Hall. Weekdays in the Chapel: Mass every morning at 6.30 a. m. 
Rosary and Benediction, on Sundays & Thursdays 7.30 p. m. Vespers on 
Sunday 4 p. m. The Chapel is open for private devotions until 9.30 p. m. 
Extra Services will be announced. 

J. Bernard Schmidt, R. C. P. oi Cambridge Cape Province (South-Äfrica). 

GERM AN PROTESTANT SERVICE 

will be held on Sunday June 6 th at 4 p. m., Sunday June 20 th at 4 p. m., 
Tuesday July 6 lh at 7 p. m. The Service conducted by 

Pastor JL Röchling, Prediger der Brüdergemeinde, Berlin. 



THE RUHLEBEN CONCERT SEÄSON. 

A Retrospect. 

WHEN the first instrumental concert in the Camp was announced, 
one awaited it with pleasant antieipation, although one's feelings 
were somewhat tempered by the fear that it might prove an incidental 
funetion, a transcient manifestation of music in the Camp. These 
feelings have proved to be entirely unjustified. Function has followed 
funetion breathlessly. We have been swirled from concert to play, 
from play to lecture, from lecture to debate, and thence back again 
to the concert, to recommence the cycle anew. ftmazing things have 
happened. The orchestra has undergone various changes before it 
eventualiy became the thing which it was at the last concert. Ät 
first a few musicians joined, then came other people in ever-swelling 
numbers until at last the orchestra comprised almost every instru- 



— 20 — 

mcnt available in the Camp, though pcrhaps not all the cxccutive 
artists. Yet even up to the end of the season, owing to obvious 
reasons it has been impossible to obtaiu a complete orchestra. Hence 
the piano has been sorely taxed and possibly the pianists, although 
one has small doubt lipon closer observance of many among them, 
that they are naturally possessed of more than the average soloist 
qualities, und are eminently adapted for the fimction of filling out 
the orchestra is specially in the timpani parts. But the lack of 
füll instrumental sources while occasioning some regret on the part 
of the musicians in the Camp, has in no way confounded the 
conductor. Though we may have discerned carping in the place 
of harping, no true lover of art if he views the matter impartially 
can avoid admitting that Mr. Adler has done everything in his 
power, has drawn upon the uttermost resources of his knowledge, 
personality and sensibility. The obvious restrictions with which 
he has been faced would have daunted any other. It is difficult 
to think of any musician in the Camp who could have dared as 
he has had we not been granted his presence among us. One has 
been positively startled by the things wich both choir and orchestra 
have done — things wich one feels could never have taken place, 
had not Mr. Adler occupied the position of conductor. The scope 
and quality of the programmes has also amazed. Nothing has been 
too grand for Mr. Adler, to attempt its re-arrangement, nothing 
has been too small to be included in his scheme. Though one may 
have missed the music for which one has individual preference, 
a surprisingly wide ränge of composers is covered by the names 
which have appeared on the programmes» Mr. Adler has run the 
changes on Bach and Offenbach; in quick succession we have 
had Beethoven, Brahms, Balfe, Bellini and Ballalaica solos ; Wagner 
has alternated with Waldteufel Waltzes. 

We have had extracts from the Master Singer, the Messiah, and 
the Mikado ; both kinds of Strauss, Wagner and Woodforde-Finden. 
Altogether the majority of the concerts given have occupied a 
distinct place in the amusement of the Camp. They have also had 
the addition of incidental humorous points. Thus we have obtained 
the curious experience of hearing an intricate Bach Sonata gracefully 
rendered by a Savage. During another Performance, the Concerto 
Grosso Mo. 6 of Händel, we have witnessed a stränge spectacle, 
that of Conn doing the steering, whilst Steer did the conning. And 
here while the humour holds one, it seems not presumptious 
to suggest that while the soaring enthusiasm of the conductor, 
natural to him by name and nature, constrains him to "leap upon 
the mountains" he should avoid anything which could suggest an 
attempt at jumping on the Dales or sitting on the Fields. But we 
must be serious, for truly the task of reviewing anything of so 
complex a nature as the Ruhleben Concert Season is no mean task. 

(Continued on page 22) 



21 — 




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— 22 



No-one realises more fully than we do the qualities of the fare 
presentcd to us. But one feels that here, removed from ordinary 
conditions, we might well have avoided such stale stagers as 
"Elijah" and the "Messiah." Nor are we alone in this feeling — 
others share it also. In fact one feit at the actual Performances, 
to use the words though not the meaning of a writer in the 
„In Ruhleben Camp" that though "they sang most lustily, the 
room was against them." One also feels that with such excellent 
string performers as many among the interned, we might have 
obtained more Chamber music, both classical and modern, music 
performed through a medium truly proportionate to the resources 
of the Camp and which could have received fuller preparation than 
that accorded to most of the works performed. Also, we might 
have, by this means, extended the scope of the Performances so 
that they would include a few modern progessive works. Of course 
we have had a Wagner evening carried out by some of the most 
refined artists in the Camp, namely Messrs. Bonhote, Conn, 
Cossart, Hewitt, Howie, Weber and Schweitzer and a red-letter 
programe comprising works by Schillings and Strauss. Also we 
have had the 150* Psalm, which, while scarcely realising ones 
ideal Performance of a Franck composition, was certainly a candid 
exposition of Mr. Ädler's capabilities. Älthough entirely deprived 
of Debussy and Ravel, we have been stirred to memories of both 
these composers and others by the pianoforte compositions of Mr. 
Roland Bocquet. But we must not fall into the hypercritical vain. 
After all we have obtained Performances here which go greatly 
beyond what one would have obtained in many places without the 
Camp. In fact, some could scarcely be imagined in the ordinary 
course of events. Even those who value such matters according 
to expenditure cannot but admit that they have been given Schillings 
for the outlay of a few Pfennings. But joking apart, we have much 
of real value to remember. The singing of Professors Keel and 
Bonhote, the excellent technical display by Mr. Ludlow, the inter- 
pretative qualities of Prof. Riley, the piano-playing of Messrs. 
Lindsay and Field, the most artistic work of Mr. Norman Hewitt, 
each of these has contributed to evoke much deep feeling. 
Especially to be mentioned is the fine sympathetic work and subtle 
pentative feeling of Mr. Chas. Weber and the excellent pianoforte 
accompaniments of Mr. Leland Cossart. One wonders why the 
work of the latter has not appeared on our programmes and also 
that of such musicians as Mr. Edgar L. Bainton, Prof. B. J. Dale, 
and Prof. Treharne. Also one desires, after hearing the pianoforte 
works ^ of Mr. Bocquet, to be given further opportunities for 
appreciating his work. He is delicate and pentative and possesses 
undoubted personality, though a trifle too introspective. It seems 
almost beyond belief that Mr. Bainton should have remained almost 



— 23 — 

totally out of sight, appearing only on one occasion and thcn as 
accompanist. Someone must be to blame, possibly Mr. Bainton. 
Ämong the outstanding achievements of the season was Prof. Dale's 
orchestral arrangement of the Stahford Te Deum, its one fault 
lying in the fact that the orchestration contained an inspiration 
which was entirely lacking in the music itself. Änother composer 
whose work it would be interesting to follow is Mr. Quentin 
Morvaren, although that which we have already heard leaves one 
with the acute consciousness of immaturity and a tendency toward 
somewhat laboured writing. One also wishes that some of the 
retiring pianists, overheard in the practice room, would emerge 
and give us, after the somewhat fatiguing dexterity of pianoforte 
concertos works of a more intimate or significantly personal 
character. Concerning another musical department, the bailad 
concerts, it has been suggested that if everyone recetved adequate 
recognition for their Services, Day would be speedily converted 
into a Nnight. The "Golden vanity" sung by Prof. Keel and the 
group of songs by Albert Mallinson sung by Mr. Austin were the 
finest things in these concerts. Mr. Paue also displayed 
characteristics which should certainly ensure him a high place 
among populär pianists in places beyond and outside the Camp, 
The Russian folk-songs sung at an earlier concert gave glimpses 
of the musical potentialities of the nation which is to dominate 
the art of the immediate future. It can only be regretted that they 
did not receive more adequate treatment. On lislening to folk- 
songs such as those sung by Prof. Keel and the Russians, one 
feels more and more the need of a Ruhleben Madrical Society. 
But above all, Mr. Adler has been extraordinary, not content with 
undertaking to beat time, lacking the drum on which to relieve 
his energy, he has turned to beating all records. But although 
he has obtained such surprising resuits, one cannot but feel that 
he ocassionally over-taxes himelf and others, hence the incomplete 
feeling which has been evident in many concerts. One would 
imagine that in a Camp of this nature, there should be other 
musicians capable and wiling to relieve him of a portion of 
his work as conductor, and who would undertake to arrange alter- 
nate evenings with him, thus giving him more time for his own 
preparations and thereby avoiding the artistic curse of the Camp,, 
hurry and work incomplete, owing to premature presentation. The 
worthy conductor will, one trusts, see no slight in this Suggestion, 
which is tentered tentatively, in order to aid him in putting for- 
ward the type of music in which he excels. One is certain that 
everyone in the Camp feels that he and he alone could have 
conceived and produced such work as has been placed before us 
during the late Camp Concert Season. 



— 24 — 

OFFICIÄL BULLETIN. 

Captains' Office, 
Ruhleben. 

June — 1915. 
FETCH THÄT PARCEL! 

THE new Parcels Post Office, which has been built to cope with 
an ever-increasing number of parcels has proved most satis- 
factory. We should like to appeal to the common sense and good- 
will of the Camp to assist those ofiicials who give up so much of 
their time to looking after the sartorial needs and the gaping stomachs 
(most of us would put the latter first) of the Camp. Please remember 
every parcel .;ot called for promptly means an additional worry 
and work for the post ofiicials and that you are pinching from them 
leisure hours which they appreciate just as much as you do. 

THE PLÄYING FIELDS. 
WITH the Cooperation of the military authorities in the Camp, 
as a result of negotiations with the proprietors of the race-course 
we have been ablc to rent a half of the race course for sports 
purposes, which rent is paid out of the Camp fund. The opening 
of the ground took place on Sunday Alarch 28 th and the field 
has undoubtedly been the greatest boon. Additional permission 
to use the ground for golf between 8 und 9 a. m. was secured 
mainly in the interests of the numerous golf Professionals we have 
amongst us. Cricket arrangements are referred to in the Editorial 
columns, and we feel assured these arrangements will meet with 
the approval of the Camp as a whole. 

THE RUHLEBEN NIGHT CLUBS 

WE beg to announcethat the long-looked for sanitaryaccomodation 
is now practically complete and will soon be in füll working order. 
New latrines with a water flush have been built by the authorities 
behind Barracks 5 and 6 and also near the Tea House, and they 
are now merely awaiting the completion of the drainage System to 
throw them open to the public. Pending this, the existing institutions 
are being thoroughly disinfected three times daily and should there 
be any considerable delay, a few rat- traps may be invested in. 

SPRING-CLEÄNING. 

IT is a necessary evil, more necessary in Ruhleben perhaps than 
elsewhere, so please don't grouse at your box being made as sweet 
as a new nut. 

THÄT — DUST. 

PERMISSION has been given for the use of the fire-hose for 
laying the dust. The dustbins are to have lids, please use them, 

(Continued on page 26) 



25 




DIX'S LÄTEST EXERCISE. 

Mr. Dix recommends his pupils to do a few preparatory exercises in their 

boxes before attending his physical culture class on the race-course ; above 

is one oi the simpler numbers on Mr. Dix's new chart. 



— 26 — 

and thcn the centre yard will have less the appearance o! a second- 
hand ash-heap. 

BÄTHING LUXURIES. 

THE bathing facilities across the road being considerably cxtcnded, 
in future no-one will have an excuse for taking a bath less than 
once a week. Bathing is allowed in all barracks at certain hours, 
but despite the Ädonis figures of the majority of us, we must urgently 
request bathers to see that the doors are kept closed during these 
times, lest visitors being shown round the Camp, receive a shock. 
We are happy to be able to report that as soon as the new bogs 
are opened, the old ones will be closed down and converted into 
sheds with shower baths and facilities for washing clothes. 

MORE HOT WÄTER. 

THE boiler-house has made good and as soon as the authorities 
permit, another shed will be erected for the two boilers now lying 
idle. Don't grouse at dubbing up your groschen or half-groschen 
as the case may be, for with the surplus we obtain from this source 
the canteen prices and the dry stores prices are reduced. 

THE MEN WITH THE BUTTONS & THE WÄTER QUEUE. 

TO the Camp ! Many officials have to attend to their duties 
at certain times — they have to be there, whether they like it or 
not, so please don't grumble if they do go to the head of the queue. 

To the Officials ! If you have no duties awaiting you, be a 
sport and take your turn with the rest. 

LAW & ORDER & COMMON SENSE. 

THIS reminds us to appeal for a greater amount of Cooperation 
between the majority of the camp and that minority who give up 
their time and energy in the interests of the majority. The Camp 
officials are voluntary and unpaid workers and obtain but few 
Privileges. Why bother the postman in your barrack to pass an 
extra card or letter when you know it is only the Captain who 
can give permission? Why bother him at all hours of the day 
for notepaper and cards ? He wants to take some part in the foot- 
ball or cricket as well as you. This also applies to your barrack's 
Cashier. Remember to sign on the proper day and save him and 
yourself trouble. You all owe a great debt to these men who spend 
many an hour in their boxes working for you while you are playing 
your games on the recreation ground. 

Help the Police Force and do not forget they are not paid 
London Policemen but are doing their utmost to preserve order 
in your own interest. Änd if they weren't here, you'd have something 
decidedly "wuss". 



— 27 — 

EDUCÄTION. 
ÄS stated in the editorial columns, lectures and school clässes 
to meet all requiremcnts have been set afoot. The Camp Fund is 
bcaring the initial cost. 

CAMP ÄRISTOCRÄTS. 
THOSE who receive passes for the casino from the doctor 
are reminded that these must be renewed every ten days and a 
visit to the doctor is the first step towards renewal. Therefore* 
keep your eye on the official notice-board and note EXÄCT time; 
the Doctor is in attendance for this purpose. 

WORKING PARTIES. 

WORKING parties have been organised and put under the 
supervision of Mr. Sharp, Bar. 8. All are paid out of the Camp 
Fund and we trust that by this arrangement, you are saved the 
trouble of dodging gentlemen looking for fatigue parties, but when a 
little job has to be done in a hurry put your Shoulders cheeriuily 
to the wheel and don't ask about the wages. 

Ä GREETING FROM DÖBERITZ. 

Ä postcard has been received by Mr. Powell from Sergeant- 
Major Francis, sending us good wishes from our countrymen in 
Döberitz. A suitable reply has been sent in the name of the whole 
Camp. 

SANATORIUM ARRANGEMENTS. 

ARRANGEMENTS have been made with the American Embassy, 
so that sick men who have no home in this country and are not 
allowed to proceed to England and also have not access to funds 
can go to Dr. Weiler 's Sanatorium in Westend nr. Berlin, Ä number 
of our fellows have already been sent there and report most favourably 
on the treatment and food. We wish them a speedy recovery but 
do not know if they will appreciate our wish, as this may mean, 
a speedy return. 

GROWING LADS. 

ARRANGEMENTS have been made for the many growing lads, 
who are in need of extra nutrition to receive daily a glass of milk 
with a raw egg broken into it. The expense is being borne by the 
Camp Fund. 

WANT TO SEE THE CAPTAIN? 

WE should be glad if those members of the Camp who have 
business to transact in the Captains' Office would apply between 
8 and 9 and 2.30 and 3.30. There is so much work to be done 
and so little space and time at our disposal that this request is but 

reaSOnable. (Continued on page 31) i 



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— 29 




We have pleasure in announcing a special cornpetition 
open to ali members of the Camp for the best original 











dealing with Camp life. Stories should not exceed 1600 words 
and it should be borne in mind that they have to pass the 
Censor. Not foeing able to secure a laurel wreath, we oifer 
to the authors of all stories used a beautifully engraved Camp 
Goblet, which will be a real adornment to the sideboard 
at home. 

KU attempts must be sent in to Editorial Offices, Grand 
Stand No. 1, (next door to Library) not later than June 14*t>. 

The Editor's decision is in all cases final. 




UHLEBEN CA 
SHOE 




Only Finest Qualsty Leather Used. 

Boots & Shoes Soled & Heeled. 

HAND-SEWN WORKÄ SPECIÄLITY! 

Clogs re-soled- Moderate Prices I 



New Shop, End of Bärrack IV 

(When closedj apply Barrack IV, Box 11.) 

— o p o u g=o D X 



30 — 




i 
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Y SEND FO 



?- 



when you can buy all that the heart 
(or the stomach) desires at 



Fruit in Season, 
Tinned Delicacies, Sweets, etc. 

Open from 9.30 — 11 a. m. and 3.30 — 5 p. m. 
(Sundays closed; Saturdays open tili 6 p. m.) 



\ 



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BUTTON 

can gel you anything you 
want in the sports line. 

There are some real bar- 
gains going in 

Cricket hats, 
Cricket Shirts, 

etc. 

PATROM SE HOME IN- 
DUSTRIES! 

You all know where the 
shop is. 

If you don't, ask a police- 
man ! 




Russian Tailor 

Grand Slanü 1. 1 



(Next door to Catholic 
Chapel) 

ALL WORK DONE 
PERSONÄLLY. 

ESTIMÄTES FREE. 

Home adress: 
Barrack 11, Box 26. 



- 31 — 

THANKS ! 
WE bcg to cxprcss our sinccrc thanks to the many donors both 
in England und Germany for continually scnding the giits of food- 
stufls, clothes and litcraturc to the Camp generally. Especially 
would we mention two gifts ol 400 and 200 parcels respectively 
from the Church Ärmy, which parcels are a model which it would 
be well to quote in letters home. Each contained one tin sausages, 
or Camp Pie, butter, cocoa, tin of bisquits, soap, article of clothing, 
a New Testament and Prayer Book and a card of greeting. 

SUMMER FÄSHIONS. 

IT was at the Suggestion of the Captains that the American 
Embassy ordered the sets of summer clothing which have been so 
appreciated in the Camp. 

POSTÄL ORDERS. 

Postal Orders are no longer paid out in the morning but may 
now be cashed from 6 — 7 on Tuesday and Friday evenings. 
This alteration has been made in order to meet the wishes of those 
gentlemen who prefer to spend their mornings on the playing iield 
rather than on the money queue. 

OUR FRIENDS, THE ÄUTHORITIES. 

WE should like to take this opportunity of expressing our thanks 

to the Military officers in Charge of the camp for their courtesey 

on all occasions and for their efforts and goodwill toward making the 

conditions of the camp as pleasant as posible under the circumstances^ 

SCHLUSS. 
WE trust that the Camp will understand from the foregoing that 
with whatever success our efforts may be crowned we appeal to 
the fair play and common sense wich is characteristic of our fellow 
countrymen to assist us in our arduous task. 

FOR THE CÄPTÄINS. 

(signed) /. Powell. 

'uhleben Printing Works. 

All kinds of printing, duplicating, typing execuUd at 
eost price. Most arlistic work euer produced on a cyclo- 
duplicating machine. 

For terms etc., enquire of 

The Camp Printer, L. J. Spicer, 

Grand Stand No. 1 
(between library and parcels - post office). 



32 — 



EXPERT COLOURED 
BÄRBER. 

Also REFRESHING DRINKS. 
LEMON SQUÄSH. 

Between Pond Stores & Barrack 12. 

Mr. PEARCE, 

Barrack 2, Loft, 

will give lessons in Elocution 
and Voice Production. 

SunnySmitty 

Some Shoe-Black! 

THE BEST IN THE CAMP! 

Business hours: 6 — 10.30. 

BLACK, BROWN or WHITE ! 

Corner Barrack 10. 



BOOTS!! BOOTS!! BOOTS!! 

(To say nothing of shoes and clogs!) 
Small repairs done ! Ycry neat work, 

Small patches a speciality. 
W. Chapman, Barrack 8, Loft S. 

Try the Russiän Bärber 

in Barrack 11. 

All the Barrack likes him. 
You will like him ioo. 

FIRST CLÄSS 
PEDICURE 

by 

GEORGE TEGER, 

Professional Coiffeur, 
Grand Stand. 



TheRnhleben School Exchanoe 

oi UIHGES 



Vi illltl If 



Manager : Ä. Richardson, 

Barrack 5, Box 1. 

New Classes beginning during this 
month. Hll languages taught ! Private 
or Class Tuition! 

Äpply to Manager or Secretary, 
T. W. Wilson, Barrack 4, Box 23. 



Barrack 5B. 

Do you want to seil 
anything ? 

Do you want to buy 
9 anything? 

Consult the Exchange & Mart 
Register. 



Do yoo wanl lo seil Ine oromoplione ? 

Or buy an ice cream maeoine? 

If so, an advertisement in our Exchange & Mart page will 

do it for you. 

Terms: i/i6 of a page, as per small advertisements above, 1 Mk. 

Special rates for series. 

Lost things found; found things restored! 

Printcd by WILH. HOPF NÄCHF., MELSUNGEN. 



ENGLISH 

TOFFEE ! 

Rnhleben Stores. 



Manufactured by 

COCKER, Crcfeld. 

(Captain of the tug o'war 
Barrack.) 



OLD ENGLISH 
TOFFEL * 

TO BL HAD AT THLCAttP STORES 
2 F^CKETS FOR 15 p*. 



SO/*\L 
TOFFLL' 




PRÄGTICÄL SHOEMAKER 

Hand-sewn or wooden-pegged. 

Don't rely on amateurs! Good work guaranteed! 

The best of leather used! 

The Shoemakers, Shop, RoxbrOUgh & Co. 

Opposite Barrack 10. 



Ruhleben Debating Society 

Meets in Grand Stand Hall on Tuesdays at 6.30. 

The following subjects will be discussed in the Coming weeks: 

"The Progress made in Civilisation has not produced 

a Corresponding Ämount of Happiness" and 
"The Introduction of the Metrie System and Coinage". 



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I. Steinbock 

the Ruhleben Tailor 

Grand Stand Hall. 



Suits 
Trousers 



from 



from 



M.40 
M 12 



do. white Linen 



from 



M. 5 



Summer Suits 



from M. 20 I 

vwwww 



S Tur7TT^vT-* TXT ^^ r+T\ Tä K TT X TXT" B y T. A. Barton for the Education S 
SA/lrlllr IN (irK/l/irtNY Committcc of thc Engländerlager für ■ 
. l¥J.l Vl^M^t J.1X V^ll^lLIfll Uli Zivilgelangene, Ruhleben, Berlin. :: : 



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